“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2”: Movie Review

The long wait is over. Harry Potter fans can now rejoice with the long-anticipated release of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 today and in theaters everywhere (though I’m sure many already went to the midnight screening last night). The film, directed by David Yates,  follows our infamous trio of Harry, Hermione, and Ron in their quest to defeat the evil Lord Voldemort and is slated to be the final installment in the mega-franchise. But — is it worth the wait? The hype? The hoopla? Does this last film live up to all of the lofty expectations and do justice to J.K. Rowling‘s book? Well, lucky for us, The Lantern has Potter extraordinaire William Buhagiar to give us the scoop and tell us what we might be in store for. Mr. Buhagiar does possess a Ph.D in Rowling Studies from the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft & Wizardry and is an all-around film nerd. Here is his film review. — P.E.

It is arguably very melodramatic to begin this review by examining the brutal reality that nothing, not even anything as exquisite as the Harry Potter series, lasts forever. For the past twelve (out of twenty years of my life), I’ve always had a Harry Potter-something to look forward to, a reason to assemble amongst fellow nerds in bookstores and movie theaters in the middle of the night, waiting to resume by page or screen the epic tale of the Boy Who Lived. Now, after over a decade, I’ve stepped off the Hogwarts Express for good. Is it fair or is it absurd to view this as the most prominent rite of passage I have yet experienced? Outrageous as it may seem, never before have I felt so distant from childhood. My childhood was Harry Potter, and Harry Potter is now over. It is absolutely the most exhausted I’ve ever felt.

Deathly Hallows: Part II doesn’t ease the audience into the narrative – if you haven’t seen Part I, the film makes it very clear that you do not belong here. The Order of the Phoenix is at its weakest, Harry has just buried the heroic house-elf Dobby, and the despicable Dark Lord Voldemort has violated Albus Dumbledore’s tomb to steal the Elder Wand, one of the Deathly Hallows and the most powerful magical instrument ever created…and so it begins.

Within minutes, the trio (each of whom reach their acting peak — they’re all superb) are raiding Gringott’s Wizarding Bank, flying over London atop a monstrous dragon, and quickly realize the shit has hit the fan when Voldemort discovers their secret mission to undo him – this, among other things, ultimately leads back to Hogwart’s, where the good guys will make their final stand against the bad guys. The Battle of Hogwarts, which should’ve been an insanely climactic cinematic spectacle, was generally a brief, disappointing series of flashes of magical combat. The handful of notable deaths we found devastating in the book are examined all-too-briefly here, and the novel’s profound examination of the consequences of war, the need to keep fighting and the triumph of good over evil feel tossed aside at times.

However, the film achieves something of a phenomenon in one of the series’ central characters, Professor Severus Snape, whose storyline ultimately lifts the quality of the movie tenfold and who becomes the primary focus of the film for a good stretch of about seven minutes. This was not only the finest chapter of the book series, but will ultimately go down as the finest sequence in the adaptations. There are many movies I will discuss and casually claim I have cried during (when in fact I just found them sad), but I promise I do not even mildly exaggerate when I say that I was sobbing, harder than I ever have before in a movie, during the scenes that properly explain the complicated, brilliant and ultimately tragic character that is Professor Severus Snape. Alan Rickman, who for eight films showed us a cold, sneering Potions Master with a disposition for sadism, annihilates the image he’s so artfully sustained for the past decade and brings something new to him – his vulnerability, desperation and grief stirred me into a frenzy and I couldn’t help but openly sob during Snape’s finest hour. God bless Alan Rickman.

I’ve always had a rocky relationship with the Harry Potter films; this is no secret; some I’ve come to appreciate and some I’ve come to absolutely despise. In the case of Deathly Hallows: Part II, my initial response is generally mixed. Something felt anti-climactic; many important events overlooked, but when the film got it right, it was nearly perfect. We can’t expect the films to be anything quite as extraordinary as the novels, I suppose, and they must always be viewed as separate entities. What I will always remember fondly will be the books, and the films will always be there to provide some quick entertainment. There will be no more Harry Potter releases, all is said and done, and there will be no more speculation over it. Despite my many grievances, it’s been fun watching J.K. Rowling’s world translated to the big screen, though sometimes infuriating for ten years. Mischief managed.

William’s Rating

A Special ‘Harry Potter’ Retrospective (Part I)

With the upcoming — and immensely anticipated release of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part II scheduled for release on July 15th, I thought now would be the perfect time to take a closer look at the “Harry Potter” series film by film, leading up to this latest (and final?) installment. However, I wanted to give the series the respect it deserves — and alas, I am not the right person for this weighty undertaking. In fact, as sad as it is for me to admit, I only recently watched the very first film (which I thoroughly enjoyed) and will certainly watch the rest of the films before “Deathly Hallows: Part II” is released. No, this retrospective needed to be written by an incisive professor of the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. This special Magic Lantern series is written by William Buhagiar (who previously contributed to this website with his Top 5 Tim Burton Films), a man who knows his movies and has an astute knowledge of Rowling’s works.

This first installment serves as an introduction Buhagiar, a passionate ‘Potter’ fan, reflects on a decade of the cinematic adaptations of J.K. Rowling’s “seven-volume masterpiece” (to use his words). The following installments will feature mini-reviews of each film — plus, a look at the all-star cast that the films have featured. I hope all of you Potter fans out there enjoy this as much as I have enjoyed reading it — and, as always, feel free to share your own thoughts and opinions…even if you strongly disagree. Let him know. William is a big boy…he can take it. — P.E.

Very rarely, and I mean very rarely, does a story come along that so radically explodes into public consciousness. One perfect example of this, undeniably, would be the ‘Harry Potter’ series.

The ‘Harry Potter’ phenomenon, for me, began in 1999, when I was given a copy of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone for my ninth birthday. Not yet familiar with J.K. Rowling’s extraordinary creation of a world-within-a-world featuring witches, wizards, dragons, aerial broomsticks, potion lessons, etc., I approached the then-obscure book with nothing more than a vague curiosity…and the rest is history.

Now, twelve years later, I am still as furiously obsessed with Rowling’s masterfully executed seven-volume saga of good versus evil as I was upon completing the very first ‘Potter’ novel. Myself, and many others my age, are grateful to be part of what is lovingly referred to as “The Potter Generation,” as we essentially grew up with Harry. From the release of “Sorcerer’s Stone” up until the savagely-anticipated unveiling of “Deathly Hallows,” (the fastest-selling book in history, by the way) we, the madly-devoted fans, would faithfully wait years in between the releases of each volume – which, as any fan would admit, was agonizing. We gladly waited on obscenely long lines at bookstores for the midnight release of each book – not for the simple novelty of attending a midnight ‘Potter’ event, but because we simply could not wait another second to resume the story and hunt feverishly for answers to the questions we had been asking since reading the previous book. Was Snape really Lord Voldemort’s servant? Who was the unknown wizard who stole Slytherin’s locket? How many more beloved characters would we have to confront the devastation of losing in the war against the Death Eaters? And what was the significance of Dumbledore’s momentary “look of triumph” upon discovering that Voldemort had used Harry’s blood as a component for his rebirth?

During the third book, “Prisoner of Azkaban,” Rowling’s books began to grow steadily, palpably darker – and after the fourth, “Goblet of Fire,” it was abundantly clear that these books were no longer the harmless, delightful children’s stories we had grown accustomed to. They had now adapted a dramatically darker and disturbing tone. Beloved characters were dropping dead left and right, a brutal genocide arose and characters more shockingly cruel and inhumane than we could have ever expected in a ‘Potter’ book were introduced. The books had suddenly evolved from sweet, charming children’s stories into a ferociously suspenseful political fairy tale – hence the true magic of Rowling’s writing: her story was now appealing to more adults as favorably as it had to her younger readers. She understood that her young readers who began the stories as children were now more mature, and ready for something deeper, darker, and undeniably more violent than we had ever expected.

Naturally, books as wildly successful as the ‘Potter’ saga are bound to be adapted into films, and adapted they were. Warner Brothers seized the film rights while the ‘Potter’ name was still a hot item, and since 2001, I’ve watched the stories be translated from beloved text to big screen blockbusters. It is common knowledge amongst those I discuss the ‘Potter’ movies with that I find the movies less-than-satisfying, to put it mildly. Of course, as argued to me in the past, books and movies are two very separate mediums, which I must respect – but a Harry Potter junkie like me can only respect so much before he is tempted to rip out his eyeballs in frustration. For this retrospective, I will attempt to maintain a less-prejudiced mindset, and view each film as it is meant to be viewed – as a motion picture…no more and no less. Naturally, covering each aspect of the series (roughly 5,000 pages of story and exactly 1,168 minutes of cinema) is relatively impossible for this humble posting, so I will be covering those topics which I found most distinct throughout the adaptations of Rowling’s novels.

Henceforth, I will now begin discussing each film in the franchise, beginning with 2001’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. With the very last installment hitting theaters in July, this will indeed be a bittersweet undertaking. The ‘Potter’ series has been with me for over half my life, and as Harry grew older, I grew older. Despite the fact that the story itself came to a close (for me) July 22nd, 2007, upon completing the very last novel in the series, I am still not looking forward to the lights coming up in the theater after “Deathly Hallows Part II,” when I will have to bid Harry, Hogwarts, Ron, Hermione, Snape and Dumbledore my final, inevitably tearful farewell.

Thank you, Miss Rowling, for giving us such a marvelous story. — by William Buhagiar

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